Book Review: Biocultural Creatures

BookReviewLogoReview by Niclas Hundahl

If we are to develop a new theory of embodiment, we must think of the human as a biocultural entity. That is, a being always both affected by our habitat as well as our biological body. For anybody sceptical of this idea, just imagine going about without breathing the oxygen in the air all around you. A mundane activity, but nonetheless one that is central to our continued existence, we rely on our environment and changes in response to it. This is the idea at the core of Samantha Frost’s Biocultural Creatures: Toward a New Theory of the Human (Duke University Press, 2016), that even our atoms aren’t free from outside influences.

25942565Samantha Frost is Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois. Her doctoral dissertation considered the materialist dimensions of John Hobbes’s philosophy and theory of politics. In her dissertation Frost asked what would happen if we were to read Hobbes’s account of the human as wholly embodied, rather than split between body and soul, and what sort of political ontologies would appear. After finishing her dissertation, and later publishing it, Frost wished to “continue to think about how a materialist understanding of the self might reshape our understanding of politics – and […] to do such thinking in a contemporary vein…” (22). So she began taking courses in biology, chemistry and related subjects, to familiarise herself with the material building blocks that constructs the human. Biocultural Creatures is a result this thinking. Continue reading “Book Review: Biocultural Creatures”

Book Review: The Clamorgans

BookReviewLogoReview by David Kilgannon

Julie Winch opens her book The Clamorgans: One Family’s History of Race in America (Hill & Wang, 2011) bemoaning the failure of Charles Dickens to visit the Clamorgan family’s “bathing saloon” during his visit to St. Louis, Missouri in 1842. If the Victorian novelist had attended, Winch speculates, there may have been another Dickens novel as the story of the Clamorgan clan provided a range of the archetypally Dickensian tropes of “hapless orphans, wily villains, women seduced and betrayed by the men they trusted, imposter of one kind or another, with an unscrupulous lawyer or two thrown in the mix” (3). Comparing an actual family to a novelist’s work sets a high standard for any tale, but is more  than surpassed in Winch’s engrossing narrative history of one biracial American family.

10308115Through the life and times of the Clamorgan family of St. Louis, Winch traces the development of the idea of race and its role in family life, the law and broader American society from 1781 to the early decades of the twentieth century. The narrative begins with the clan’s progenitor, Jacques Clamorgan, whose uncertain origins and even murkier ethics set the stage for more than a century of contention. Specifically, this tension centred on Jacques’ questionable investment in large tracts of land in the upper Louisiana territory alongside the fact that “over the years he lived openly with a succession of black women, all of them at some point his slaves, and several of these women bore him children” (39). Clamorgan’s provision for these children, his mixed-race illegitimate heirs, went on to produce more than a century of often bitter litigation. Winch is sympathetic but clear sighted in showing how Jacques’ less than scrupulous business methods, as well as the racist sentiment inherent within the United States’ justice system, conspired to leave a legacy of unfulfilled riches that occupied generations of Clamorgan’s descendants. Continue reading “Book Review: The Clamorgans”

Book Review: Found

BookReviewLogoReview by Kasandra Lambert

In her debut novel, Found (SparkPress, 2016), certified nurse practitioner Emily Brett presents the story of Natalie, a young ICU nurse living in Denver, Colorado who is desperate for change. This novel follows Natalie as she leaves her stable job and becomes a travel nurse, placed in locations around the United States and abroad for a set amount of time.

29332829Natalie’s somewhat impulsive decision to quit takes on new urgency  after a strange encounter during the final days of her job in Denver. She fears a coworker, Beatty, has had a hand in killing her husband, who was a patient under Natalie’s care. She shares these concerns with her boss before leaving and thinks little of it until strange occurrences start to happen in all her travel assignments. Continue reading “Book Review: Found”

Book Review: The Port-Wine Stain

BookReviewLogoReview by Anna Kirsch

The Port-Wine Stain (Bellevue Literary Press, 2016) is the third installment of Norman Lock’s American Series, a series where each novel is  a stand-alone narrative dedicated  to memorializing  great American writers by writing in a style that is part pastiche and part homage. The Port- Wine Stain is devoted to celebrating Edgar Allan Poe.

27135742The Port -Wine Stain is narrated by Edward Fenzil to an undescribed listener he calls Moran. Fenzil is a young surgical assistant to Dr.Thomas Dent Mütter, who in the winter of 1844, meets Edgar Allan Poe. While to the literary reader Poe is the most recognizable  figure, Mütter is just as important to Fenzil. It is Mütter who sets up the meeting between Poe and Fenzil and it is Mütter’s early form of cosmetic surgery that introduces into Fenzil’s imagination the concept of physiognomy. Physiognomy maintaines that a person’s character is determined by their physical body, or to be exact, the shape of the body. The idea that a twisted body could be the sign of a twisted soul is the ideological cornerstone of the novel. Continue reading “Book Review: The Port-Wine Stain”