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Moving on from Election 2016

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Suffrage_universel.pngIf you follow this blog, you know that our primary focus has been health and humanities, the intersection of medicine and social and cultural studies. But today, half the country feels they have swallowed a bitter pill. The other half feel that they’ve been vindicated, perhaps, but all can agree that this has been the most unhealthy election cycle in living memory. I found myself listening to the results in the wee hours, and then reflecting on what this might mean, not only for our nation, but also for our small communities and families. I want to provide here some encouragement, some insight, and we as a forum want to give our readers a sense of solidarity–for we are with you.

To those who supported Sen. Hillary Clinton, I say this. The grief you feel is real and you have a right to it. As with any loss, the anger and shock are feelings that we must work through. But let’s remember that despair and hope are not feelings, but choices. We must work against despair, even at our darkest moments, because despair is paralyzing. We must choose hope, because hope cannot stand without us. But also, while you mourn the loss of a dream, be assured: this was still a historic moment. You voted for the first Continue reading “Moving on from Election 2016”

Book Review: This Mortal Coil

BookReviewLogoReview by Stephanie Hudson.

In her new book, This Mortal Coil: The Human Body in History and Culture (Oxford University Press, 2016), Fay Bound Alberti writes that “our bodies are products of the stories we tell” (19). And this is the work Bound Alberti takes up, to explore stories of bodies and how these stories impact our embodied experience. She works to trace, and perhaps complicate, origins and potential futures of stories of bodies, with particular focus on women’s bodies.

26401367Bound Alberti is a cultural historian whose work is situated within histories of medicine and the body. Her previous work includes Matters of the Heart: History, Medicine, and Emotions (Oxford University Press, 2010), which was shortlisted for the Longman History Today book of the year award. Bound Alberti co-founded the Centre for the History of Emotions at Queen Mary University of London, where she is an honorary senior research fellow. Through a Western lens, This Mortal Coil is located in Britain, and in part, North America.

Bound Alberti’s work in This Mortal Coil was motivated by an interest “in looking at the body as an assemblage of parts, and why it was that some parts take on particular significance and meanings at certain points in history” (206). Each chapter focuses on a different body part—spine, breast, genitalia, heart, brain, skin, tongue, and gut—taking the reader on a journey “from inside out, from our very core to the surface of our body and the boundaries between self and other” (16). Continue reading “Book Review: This Mortal Coil”

Medical Humanities Posts Open!

unnamedNEWS AND NOTES: Positions open for the Medical Humanities journal (BMJ). Medical Humanities launched in 2000 and has since become a leading international journal that reflects the whole field of medical humanities.

Publishing original research, case studies, review essays and more; the journal aspires to encourage a high academic standard for this evolving and developing subject. The journal has recently broadened its scope by publishing an additional two guest edited Themed Editions a year focusing on key conversations in the field. Recent issues have included ‘Critical Medical Humanities’ and ‘Science Fiction and Medical Humanities’. Medical Humanities also offers an interactive blog with film, poetry and book reviews and regular updates on @MedHums_BMJ further contributing to the latest debate and dialogue.

The journal is currently seeking to fill two positions:

1.Editor-in-Chief Medical Humanities

Position: EIC

The Institute of Medical Ethics and BMJ are looking for the next Editor-in-Chief who can continue to shape Medical Humanities into a dynamic resource for a rapidly evolving field. Candidates should be active in the field, keen to facilitate international perspectives and maintain an awareness of trends and hot topics. The successful candidate will act as an ambassador for the journal supporting both pioneering authors and academics publishing their first papers. The candidate will also actively promote and strengthen the journal whilst upholding the highest ethical standards of professional practice. International and joint applications are welcomed. Interviews will be held on 24th March 2017. Term of office is 5 years; the role will take 12-15 hours a week. Contact Kelly Horwood (khorwood@bmj.com) for more information and to apply with your CV and cover letter outlining your interest and your vision for future development of the journal. Application deadline: 24th February 2017. Start date: June 2017

2. Blog Curator and Books Editor at Medical Humanities.

Position: Blog Curator/Books Editor

It is a single, combined role as all book reviews are published on the Blog. The role involves: Commissioning and editing content, including reviews, for the Medical Humanities Blog; maintaining the Medical Humanities Blog and updating it regularly (currently on a weekly schedule, but this could be flexible within reason); liaising with publishers to receive new titles and organise reviews of relevant books for the Blog; contributing to the editorial team (comprising the editor-in-chief, associate editors and BMJ Publishing staff) that leads and manages both the journal and Blog, including attending the annual editorial team meeting; curating the content of the Blog to reflect the journal’s identity, priorities and interests; working with social media platforms to provide a coherent online presence for Medical Humanities. The role is flexible and can be adapted according to the successful applicant’s interests and availability. On average, the role takes approximately 4-6 hours per week. If you are interested in the role, you are welcome to contact the Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Deborah Bowman, for an informal and confidential discussion. Her email address is dbowman@sgul.ac.uk.

Book Review: Biocultural Creatures

BookReviewLogoReview by Niclas Hundahl

If we are to develop a new theory of embodiment, we must think of the human as a biocultural entity. That is, a being always both affected by our habitat as well as our biological body. For anybody sceptical of this idea, just imagine going about without breathing the oxygen in the air all around you. A mundane activity, but nonetheless one that is central to our continued existence, we rely on our environment and changes in response to it. This is the idea at the core of Samantha Frost’s Biocultural Creatures: Toward a New Theory of the Human (Duke University Press, 2016), that even our atoms aren’t free from outside influences.

25942565Samantha Frost is Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois. Her doctoral dissertation considered the materialist dimensions of John Hobbes’s philosophy and theory of politics. In her dissertation Frost asked what would happen if we were to read Hobbes’s account of the human as wholly embodied, rather than split between body and soul, and what sort of political ontologies would appear. After finishing her dissertation, and later publishing it, Frost wished to “continue to think about how a materialist understanding of the self might reshape our understanding of politics – and […] to do such thinking in a contemporary vein…” (22). So she began taking courses in biology, chemistry and related subjects, to familiarise herself with the material building blocks that constructs the human. Biocultural Creatures is a result this thinking. Continue reading “Book Review: Biocultural Creatures”

Book Review: The Clamorgans

BookReviewLogoReview by David Kilgannon

Julie Winch opens her book The Clamorgans: One Family’s History of Race in America (Hill & Wang, 2011) bemoaning the failure of Charles Dickens to visit the Clamorgan family’s “bathing saloon” during his visit to St. Louis, Missouri in 1842. If the Victorian novelist had attended, Winch speculates, there may have been another Dickens novel as the story of the Clamorgan clan provided a range of the archetypally Dickensian tropes of “hapless orphans, wily villains, women seduced and betrayed by the men they trusted, imposter of one kind or another, with an unscrupulous lawyer or two thrown in the mix” (3). Comparing an actual family to a novelist’s work sets a high standard for any tale, but is more  than surpassed in Winch’s engrossing narrative history of one biracial American family.

10308115Through the life and times of the Clamorgan family of St. Louis, Winch traces the development of the idea of race and its role in family life, the law and broader American society from 1781 to the early decades of the twentieth century. The narrative begins with the clan’s progenitor, Jacques Clamorgan, whose uncertain origins and even murkier ethics set the stage for more than a century of contention. Specifically, this tension centred on Jacques’ questionable investment in large tracts of land in the upper Louisiana territory alongside the fact that “over the years he lived openly with a succession of black women, all of them at some point his slaves, and several of these women bore him children” (39). Clamorgan’s provision for these children, his mixed-race illegitimate heirs, went on to produce more than a century of often bitter litigation. Winch is sympathetic but clear sighted in showing how Jacques’ less than scrupulous business methods, as well as the racist sentiment inherent within the United States’ justice system, conspired to leave a legacy of unfulfilled riches that occupied generations of Clamorgan’s descendants. Continue reading “Book Review: The Clamorgans”